Recent Posts

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    Hiring for Startups: 5 Lessons Learned

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    I first hired someone when I was 25. I also fired someone when I was 25. Having been through both processes, I can say it’s absolutely worth it to take your time and hire the right person than waste time hiring a person, training them, and then firing them. For those of you who have done it, it’s a lot of paperwork. If you’re in the process of hiring for your startup, here are five lessons I’ve learned in the past four years.  

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    Corporate Innovation: 5 Trends Not to Ignore in 2016

    Corporate_Innovation_Speed.jpgWhether it was fear or greed, an increasing number of big brands woke up and introduced internal innovation programs in 2015. And, for good reasons: fear that a new startup could launch a disruptive new technology and steal market share, pressure to create new revenue streams — or both. Last year, our Corporate Innovation Services team witnessed a huge influx of interest from the world’s leading corporations to find new ways to innovate. Our recommendation? Do it fast.

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    5 Traits Great Startup CEOs Possess

    5 Traits Great Startup CEOs Possess

    …and so should the one you work for.

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    What Is the Biggest Opportunity for Corporate Innovation?

    Intrapreneurship is the Answer to Fueling Corporate Innovation

    Answer: The Budding “Intrapreneur”

    As a whole, the millennial generation skews entrepreneurial. According to the latest Deloitte Millennial Survey, 70 percent of Millennials see themselves working independently in the future, rather than being employed by a traditional corporation. Fast Company notes that the reason is that millennials want things companies aren’t currently giving them, namely, autonomy, creativity, and meaning.

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    11 Tips for How to Work with Early-stage Tech Startups

    How to work with startups

    1. Give the startup a single point of contact

    Appoint someone on your team who serves as a conduit and minimizes distractions for the startup. Remember that startups don’t have account management or partnership teams like large corporates. The more of your organization that a startup has to coordinate with, the less work they can do on their product.